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Bosche?

 
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Tiger
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 1:58 am    Post subject: Bosche?  Reply with quote

I may be spelling the word wrong but LeBeau says it ALL the time. What does it mean?
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Tiger
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 2:54 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

After much surfing and searching I found this:

Boche is a French slang word for ‘rascal’ first applied to German soldiers during World War One, and borrowed during the early years of that conflict into British English.

A definition is given in Songs and Slang of the British Soldier: 1914-1918, edited by John Brophy and Eric Partridge, published in 1930. I have augmented their note.

Boche is the preferred and most common English spelling. Bosche is a rarer English alternative spelling.

The word was first used in the phrase tête de boche. The French philologist Albert Dauzat believed boche to be an abbreviation of caboche, playful French slang for ‘human head,’ very much like English comic synonyms for head such as ‘the old noodle,’ noggin, nut, numbskull.

One of the ways of saying ‘to be obstinate, to be pigheaded’ in French is avoir la caboche dure. The root of caboche in the old French province of Picardy is ultimately the Latin word caput ‘head.’ Our English word cabbage has the same origin, the compact head of leaves being a perfect ‘caboche.’

Tête de boche was used as early as 1862 of obstinate persons. It is in print in a document published at Metz . In 1874 French typographers applied it to German compositors. By 1883, states Alfred Delvau's Dictionnaire de la langue Verte, the phrase had come to have the meaning of mauvais sujet and was so used especially by prostitutes.

The Germans, having among the French a reputation for obstinacy and being a bad lot, came to be named with a jesting version of allemande, namely allboche or alboche. About 1900 alboche was shortened to boche as a generic name for Germans. During the war, propaganda posters revived the term by using the phrase sale boche ‘dirty kraut.’
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Michel_LeBeau
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 11:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Interesting!  A related usage of it but not so understandable is caboche  as in putting the caboche on something or someone.  Wonder how that developed?
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Karl
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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 3:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What goes around comes around...

Tiger wrote:
...Our English word cabbage has the same origin, the compact head of leaves being a perfect ‘caboche.’
...’


One could then extrapolate Cabbage headed Germans or (fermented cabbage) Sauerkraut heads... or just Kraut,

heh, heh.
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Karl
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 20, 2010 10:24 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Michel_LeBeau wrote:
Interesting!  A related usage of it but not so understandable is caboche  as in putting the caboche on something or someone.  Wonder how that developed?


It would seem that this word, kibosh, is what you are referring to.  According to most sources, kibosh, meaning stop or end, i.e. "Put the kibosh on......"  has an unknown origin.

Indeed I've heard it pronounced Ky-Bosh  The first syllable rhyming with sty.

They could have a common origin, but not much is known about this anglicized slang term.
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Major Hochstetter



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 9:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Karl wrote:
Michel_LeBeau wrote:
Interesting!  A related usage of it but not so understandable is caboche  as in putting the caboche on something or someone.  Wonder how that developed?

It would seem that this word, kibosh, is what you are referring to.  According to most sources, kibosh, meaning stop or end, i.e. "Put the kibosh on......"  has an unknown origin.
...
They could have a common origin, but not much is known about this anglicized slang term.

My initial thought was that "kibosh" was Yiddish in origin.  It still may be, as one of the earliest documented examples of its usage in the 1830s came from an English court case involving Jews.  But there is a lot of controversy and speculation on its origin.

This article has some interesting history and possibilities:
http://www.worldwidewords.org/articles/kibosh.htm
The most interesting is the reference to a Middle Eastern whip called a qurbash, or in English, kurbash.  An 1860 court case has someone defining a "kibosh" as "a piece of iron about a foot long."  While not a whip, it is still a weapon.  This one makes a lot of sense to me -- if someone wielded an iron bar against me ("put a kurbash on me"), I would certainly stop whatever it was I was doing!

Incedentally, this article mentions the heraldic term "cabossed" (though they spell it "caboshed" for similarity with "kibosh").  I would bet that "cabossed" would be related to "caboche" since it refers to an image of a head on a shield or other device.

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